Herbal Tea | Start the Day Off Right

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I am a big advocate for starting the day off right. That’s why I go so hard for green juices as a morning starter. However,  a lot of people have expressed that they cannot ‘handle’ having a green juice first thing in the morning; especially the way I have it. Don’t worry I got you, try instead incorporating herbal tea into your morning regimen.

Herbal tea is made from the infusion of herbs, spices, sometimes dried fruits, or other plant material in hot water. It does not usually contain caffeine.  While green tea and black tea are herbal and have their benefits, they usually contain caffeine and should not be consumed first thing in the morning as it may disrupt digestion. It is usually advised to consume caffeinated beverages at least an hour after eating. Caffeine inhibits the absorption of essential nutrients like calcium, it is acidic and it’s a diuretic.

Just like green juices, herbal teas have the potential to be anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, anti-bacterial, help to lower your glucose levels, help with weight control, aid in cell repair and give your cells a healthy boost. Some herbs have antioxidant properties that help prevent cellular damage from free radicals. Free radicals may contribute to the development of chronic diseases such as cancer and heart disease. Herbal teas,  made up of medicinal plants and spices, have been used traditionally for thousands of years by many cultures for controlling common health complications.

So it’s tea time ladies and gentlemen! I am going to share with you some tea options that are proven healthy starts to your day. Please wait at least 15 minutes after drinking herbal tea before eating to allow for uninterrupted and optimal digestion and absorption.

Moringa Tea (makes 1 cup)


Ingredients:

  • Moringa leaf powder (1 tsp.) or fresh Moringa leaves finely chopped (1tsp)
  • water (1 cup)
  • a squeeze lime/lemon; cinnamon leaves (2); peppermint tea bag (1) (optional)
  • ceramic cup with handle
  • ceramic saucer
  • strainer (if  loose leaves are used)

Directions:

To make tea, steep tea bags or herbs in hot water for 5 to 10 minutes in a ceramic mug,with a handle, covered with a saucer. Strain if needed. Then, drink the infusion when it has cooled enough to make it safe to drink. Warning contents are hot.

Nutritional Benefits:


All parts of the moringa tree possess medicinal properties, but the leaves with its exceptional richness of biologically available nutrients are the most useful part. Uses: anti-diabetic, anti-cancer, coagulant. Main Nutrients: High percentage of protein, iron, vitamin K, Calcium, vitamin E. Other Nutrients: vitamin C, vitamin A and Zinc.

Recipe Notes:

You will notice how the lemon or lime enhances the taste, especially in the absence of sugar. If you absolutely need some sweetness, try Stevia. It is an all natural sweetener that has no effect on glucose levels and it is deemed safe. However, there has not been enough long-term research to know it’s true effects. There is an after taste, which is more pronounced in hot beverages than cold ones. Be careful when choosing brands as some manufacturers make it as unsafe artificial sweeteners.

I particularly do not enjoy the taste of moringa on its own so I usually add peppermint or cinnamon. These options actually bring out a little sweetness in the moringa. It is not just about the taste however, as cinnamon actually encourages circulation and may be applicable for reducing some PCOS risk factors such as high cholesterol. Read more about peppermint below.

Ginger Tea (makes 1 cup)


Ingredients:

  • 2 ginger tea bags
  • water (1 cup)
  • a squeeze lime/lemon (optional)
  • ceramic cup with handle
  • ceramic saucer

Directions:

To make  tea, steep tea bags or herbs in hot water for 5 to 10 minutes in a ceramic mug covered with a saucer. Then, drink the infusion when it has cooled enough to make it safe to drink.

Nutritional Benefits:


Ginger is an underground stem or rhizome, of the plant zinger official. Studies have shown that daily consumption of ginger has the ability to reduce the probability of illnesses in general and has the potential preventive property against some chronic diseases, especially hypertension and chronic heart disease. Uses: anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-nausea. Main Nutrients: Gingerol  Other Nutrients: small amounts of vitamin B6, Magnesium, Folate, Copper and Potassium.

Recipe Notes:

You will notice how the lemon or lime enhances the taste, especially in the absence of sugar. If you absolutely need some sweetness, try Stevia. It is an all natural sweetener that has no effect on glucose levels and it is deemed safe. However, there has not been enough long-term research to know it’s true effects. There is an after taste, which is more pronounced in hot beverages than cold ones. Be careful when choosing brands as some manufacturers make it as unsafe artificial sweeteners.

Chamomile Tea (makes 1 cup)


Ingredients:

  • 2 chamomile tea bags
  • water (1 cup)
  • a squeeze lime/lemon (optional)
  • ceramic cup with handle

Directions:

To make tea, steep tea bags or herbs in hot water for 5 to 10 minutes in a ceramic mug covered with a saucer. Then, drink the infusion when it has cooled enough to make it safe to drink.

Nutritional Benefits:


Chamomile is a traditional medicinal plant. Studies suggest that chamomile has the potential to help the body with the absorption and metabolizing of sugars with efficacy. It has also been credited with having a calming and soothing effect on the body. Uses: digestive relaxant, anti-diarrheal, relaxant (aids in calming moods and can be used at night with cinnamon for deeper more relaxing sleep).Main Nutrients: Other Nutrients: small amounts of vitamin A, Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium and Folate.

Recipe Notes:

You will notice how the lemon or lime cuts out a lot of the green taste and it tastes more like unsweetened juice. If you absolutely need some sweetness, try Stevia. It is an all natural sweetener that has no effect on glucose levels and it is deemed safe. However, there has not been enough long-term research to know it’s true effects. There is an after taste, which is more pronounced in hot beverages than cold ones. Be careful when choosing brands as some manufacturers make it as unsafe artificial sweeteners.

Peppermint (makes 1 cup)


Ingredients:

  • 2 peppermint tea bags
  • water (1 cup)
  • a squeeze of lime/lemon (optional)
  • ceramic cup with handle

Directions:

To make tea, steep tea bags or herbs in hot water for 5 to 10 minutes in a ceramic mug covered with a saucer. Then, drink the infusion when it has cooled enough to make it safe to drink.

Nutritional Benefits:

Peppermint is also a traditional medicinal plant. Studies suggest that peppermint acts as an antioxidant  has the potential to help the body fight free radicals. It has also been credited with having a calming and soothing effect on the body. Uses: anti-microbial, antioxidant, digestive relaxant, anti-diarrheal. Main Nutrients: Manganese, Copper, Vitamin C  Other Nutrients: small amounts of Potassium, Magnesium, Iron, Calcium, Phosphorus, vitamin B2, Folate and vitamin A

Recipe Notes:


You will notice how the lemon or lime enhances the taste, especially in the absence of sugar and adds to. If you absolutely need some sweetness, try Stevia. It is an all natural sweetener that has no effect on glucose levels and it is deemed safe. However, there has not been enough long-term research to know it’s true effects. There is an after taste, which is more pronounced in hot beverages than cold ones. Be careful when choosing brands as some manufacturers make it as unsafe artificial sweeteners.


 

There are Way More  Herbs and Spices in the Sea

As you get deeper into a healthy lifestyle try out these herbs and spices as part of your morning regimen: tumeric, spirulina, neem, sorrel, rosemary, lemongrass (in Jamaica we call it fever grasshibiscus and star anise.  Most herbs and spices have great health benefits, so it is great to incorporate them into daily living. However, remember to do everything in moderation; and if you have never had any of these herbs before, take precautions to ensure there are no allergies.

Leave me a comment down below letting me know what you think. I would really love to hear  if any of you are herbal lovers. If there is any herb that you would like me to do some further research on, comment the name of it down below. If you just want to leave me some positivity, click the heart down below. Kindly share this post with everyone, especially someone who may need it and keep the conversation going. Thanks again for stopping by, until next time Fam, walk good.

 


Disclaimer:Any information shared is not meant to cure or treat any medical conditions. Always consult with your doctor about your personal health and wellness. I am not a health professional. All reviews are my personal opinion. Please do your own research on products and companies before using any product you find on the internet. MishiMatters does not claim responsibility for any of the products or companies discussed on this site but does its best to discuss only wholesome ones.

This post contains affiliate links. For more info click here.


Reference

Science Direct. (2015). Annals of Agricultural Science-Protective effect of peppermint and parsley leaves oils against hepatotoxicity on experimental rats. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0570178315000469

Science Direct. (2016). Food Science and Human Wellness-Moringa oleifera: A review on nutritive importance and its medicinal application. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213453016300362

Science Direct. (2017). Nutrition-Evaluation of daily ginger consumption for the prevention of chronic diseases in adults: A cross-sectional study. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S089990071630082X

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). (2016). Basic Report: 02064, Peppermint, fresh.https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/306?fgcd=&manu=&format=&offset=&sort=default&order=asc&ds=Standard+Reference&qt=&qp=&qa=&qn=&q=&ing=

WebM. (2016).Chamomile Health Benefits & Uses. https://www.webmd.com/diet/supplement-guide-chamomile#1-3

 

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